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Water Quality Improvement by Base Course Aggregate in a Permeable Pavement with Underlying Reservoir Structure

Permeable pavements are an emerging water sensitive urban design component that allow for onsite infiltration of stormwater while providing both a structurally supportive surface and full amenity value ofabove lying land. This paper reports on research investigating the water qualityeffects of modifying the structure of a permeable pavement to accommodate underlying water storage amongst aggregate for harvesting and reuse. To investigate the effects on water quality of water storage in an aggregate matrix, model pavement structures were constructed in a laboratory and a synthetic stormwater was applied directly to the pavement reservoirs.

 

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Turning the Super-tanker: Drawing on Social Theory to Enable the Transition to Sustainable Urban Water Management

Worldwide, urban water managers and strategists are grappling with the challenge of managing water resources in new ways to ensure healthy environments and communities in the future. Numerous commentators have highlighted significant social and technological barriers tothe uptake of new approaches and some are calling for a major socio-technical transition in urban water management. Social research and theory is an increasingly important factor in understanding and responding to the challenges associated with evolving a more sustainable society.

 

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Towards An Institutional Capacity Assessment Framework For Sustainable Urban Water Management

The need to change urban water management to become more sustainable is widely recognised. Recently there has been considerable financial investment in urban water reform; however these reforms have not been as successful as anticipated, mostlikely because there is a lack of criticalanalysis of existing capacity and/or capacity deficits. Understanding and assessing institutional capacity is crucial to addressing existing institutional impediments. Institutional capacity includes the human resources, intra-organisational, inter-organisational and/or external rules and incentives capacity spheres.

 

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The Impact Of End-Use Dynamics On Urban Water System Design Criteria

Demand reduction strategies such as source substitution (rainwater tanks/water reuse) and the use of water efficient appliances has the potential to significantly impact on urban water system design criteria, such as average and peak demands/wastewater flows. To quantify this impact requires knowledge of the dynamics of household end-uses (shower, toilet, washing machine, tap and outdoor use). This study utilised high-quality enduse monitoring from a Newcastle house over a 2 month period to investigate how end-use dynamics and demand reduction strategies impact on common design criteria.

 

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The Effect Of Various Intermittent Dry-Wet Cycles On Nitrogen Removal Capacityin Biofilters Systems

Stormwater biofilter systems have the potential to remove nutrients from urban runoff. These systems operate in unique intermittent dry-wet cycles that may affect their performance. Current consensus suggests that sediment drying promotes the release of potentially significant amounts of bio-available nitrogen and phosphorus upon rewetting. We sought to investigate the impact of drying/wetting cycles on biofilter performance. Eighteen columns were planted with Carex appressa which reached maturity after eight months. The recovery of biofilter systems was tested in a range of drying periods from one to eight weeks with and without a Submerged Anoxic Zone (SAZ) and carbon supplement in the filter media.

 

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Testing and Refining a Policy and Methods Framework for Water Sensitive Urban Design

An important means of facilitating the uptake of Water Sensitive Urban Design, which has much in common with ‘low impact’ approaches, is to ensure that local government plans and practices are underpinned by an appropriate set of principles. A research programme in New Zealand, that is facilitating the uptake and implementation of low impact urban design policies and practices, has developed principles as a foundation for policy development in local government statutory and non-statutory plans and guidelines. Each principle is related to practical implementation methods many of which use sustainable technologies that need to be tested for their feasibility, practicality and effectiveness.

 

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Sustainable Water Management: Achieving A Culture of Change

In the driest continent on earth, population growth, extended drought conditions and the potential impact of climate change has hammered home the need for an integrated approach to water management. Water authorities, councils, water industry organisations and developers face many challenges in delivering sustainable solutions to urban water management issues associated with stormwater management, water recycling and reuse. One of the most significant challenges is managing the cultural and organisational changes necessary to adopt new ways of thinking and to become leaders in implementing new approaches to sustainable urban water management.

 

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Study On Potential Uses Of Rainwater Harvesting In Urban Areas

Rainwater harvesting is the collection of water volume from raindrops. Rainwater harvesting has been the main source of water supply for potable and non-potable uses in the old days because the water conveyance systems were not used for water distribution during these days and the method used for rainwater harvesting was simple and primary (rainwater was mostly collected from roofs and some was collected directly from the sky). Usage of the collected water volume from rainwater harvesting was direct and without any treatment. Presently, the water supply systems have improved but the demand is increasing due to the population growth, and development.

 

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Stormwater To The Rescue: Regional Stormwater Harvesting For Ecosystem Protection And Potable Water Yield

The creation of new urban development to support population growth leads to environmental stress at a number of levels, most notably in water regime. Urbanisation and the associated introduction of impervious surfaces can lead to significant changes to hydrology and increased pollutant export from catchments which in turn can result in irreversible impacts on sensitive aquatic ecosystems. Additionally, the increased demand for water within new urban zones places a significant requirement on water supply systems to the point where substantial infrastructure investment is required to increase capacity.

 

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Roof Harvested Rainwater - Indicator Organisms, Water Quality and Risk Assessment

Deriving maximum economic and water savings benefits from rainwater harvesting in the urban environment requires the use of rainwater for internal applicationsincluding showering/bathing, laundry and toilet flushing. Widespread use of rainwater for these applications has been hindered by uncertainty over quality and perceptions of health risk. This study examines the presence and abundance ofthe faecal indicators E. coli, enterococci and total coliform in over 100 water samples collected from rainwater tanks in eastern Australia. A large proportion of samples were compliant with the requirements of mains water drinking standards, especially among those collected via a hot water system, while almost universal compliance with bathing water quality standards was observed.

 

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